THE PROJECT 

 HIGH YIELD RESOURCES 

+PLUS 

 PASSIONATE MENTORS 

 =MAXIMUM IMPACT 

PROJECT: BACK PACK

We have partnered with progressive high school classrooms to deliver an educational program we have developed titled, “Project: Back Pack.” 
Our successes in leadership within the community are direct results of partnerships; sharing of ideas and devout support towards progressive organizations that are aligned in concept with our aims. 


The goal of “Project: Back Pack” is to bridge the gap for the high performing high school students in need, by providing the students with career mentors and high yield educational materials.

 

We will deliver a presentation on STEAM careers and supply the selected students/classroom with Back Packs full of resources; (BPi 7 investment tenants, financial literacy guides, college readiness materials, math tutoring service, and a network mentors focused on career exploration).

FIND OUT ABOUT EVENTS
Fundraising Kickoff
10.1.2018, 02:00 PM
Back Pack Drive
08.17.2019, 02:00 PM
50K Invested
12.1.2020, 02:00 PM
SUPPORT THE PROJECT

If you would like to participate and support "Project: Back Pack," please sign up to receive updates. 

THE HARD TRUTH

91%

TEACHERS PURCHASE CLASSROOM MATERIALS

38%

STUDENTS CANNOT PURCHASE NECESSARY MATERIALS 

47%

TEACHERS SAY THEY LACK BASIC SUPPLIES (PENS, PAPER, AND PENCILS) FOR THEIR CLASSROOMS.

The nation’s schools are failing not just low-achieving, poor students, but their high-achieving peers as well, according to a new report from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and Civic Enterprises. Achievement Trap: How America is Failing 3.4 Million High-Achieving Students from Lower-Income Families calls for continuing the national goal of improving basic skills and ensuring minimal proficiency in reading and math among low-income students but says that there also must be a more concerted effort to promote high achievement within the same population.

According to the report, about 3.4 million students in grades K–12 come from families with incomes below the national median but still manage to score in the top quartile academically. Of these students, more than one million qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. These high-achieving, lower-income students, who the report calls “young strivers,” come from families in poverty and from working-class families and are demographically and geographically very similar to the overall population of students.

“The presence of these 3.4 million students provides hope to others caught in similar circumstances,” the report reads. “Even though they possess fewer resources and often suffer from low expectations in the classroom, many lower-income students still find ways to excel, giving us reason to believe that students can perform at very high levels despite economic disadvantages.”